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Best sources for learning Python?

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  • Best sources for learning Python?

    I have been doing the codecademy course but I wanted to know how you all learned Python?

    This will be the first real language I have tried to learn. Any book or video recommendations would be great.

  • #2
    Come up with an idea for something you would like to code up and then just keep googling until you get there. I find it to be easiest to learn when I have an end goal in mind. There are tons of python resources online. Stack overflow will be your friend.

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    • #3
      I found very useful:
      http://www.diveintopython3.net/

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      • #4
        If you don't know how to program I would recommend you finding a programming course that is written in Python and following it very closely. Probably most of what is out there are Python courses for people that already know how to program.

        If you already know how to program, the best way to get proficiency in a new language is first spend a day or two looking at the syntax and conventions of the language (in python, very recommended to read what PEP8 is all about) and then starting a real application. Also if you are in this situation probably you want to do something useful while you are learning so maybe it's a good idea using Django, Pygame or some other framework or library instead of just plain Python.

        By the way in my personal experience I already knew how to program. I learned Python together with Django basically by using Python documentation, Django documentation and obviously Google that most of the time leads to StackOverflow.

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        • #5
          I couldn't have said it better myself. I would however point you to lynda.com. I used it to get started in C and C++. It was free because I'm a student and very effective as long as you do as Zarshisha said and follow the lessons slowly and make sure you have a genuine understanding of concepts before moving on to the next lesson.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ak_74 View Post
            I found very useful:
            http://www.diveintopython3.net/
            I would also recommend it.
            There is a big difference between learning to code and learning to code well.

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            • #7
              My college professor translated to portuguese some chapters of this book. It has been helping me a lot since I started my programming course.

              I like Python, I think it's better than C or C++, I had to learn these programming languages at high school and I had so many troubles that I don't like them, really! That's the reason that I chose Chemical Engineering instead of Electrical Engineering.

              Sometimes I look for some video classes in YouTube, for some topics that I couldn't understand.

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              • #8
                Is there a decent editor that displays indents/unindents properly? This has been the hardest thing for me to get in my head that whitespace is interpreted.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the info. When I have some more time next year, I'd like to start developing decent programs for my students. I don't think BASIC or LOGO that I learned when I was younger will cut it these days!

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                  • #10
                    Coursera.org has a couple python courses. my favorite is python for everybody.
                    196

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Samsone View Post
                      Is there a decent editor that displays indents/unindents properly? This has been the hardest thing for me to get in my head that whitespace is interpreted.
                      notepad++ is a good all-purpose editor. you just have to make sure the tabs are set up right.

                      206

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by henry_hague View Post
                        Coursera.org has a couple python courses. my favorite is python for everybody.
                        196
                        I strongly agree. Coursera has some excellent Python courses. If you're a hobbyist, An Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (Part 1 and 2) from Rice University are superb.

                        For a more detailed and formal course, the chain that starts with "6.00.1x Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python" (by MIT on edx.org) is really good, especially the parts on algorithms.

                        Both are available completely free of charge and do not require you to buy textbooks.

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                        • #13
                          Someone said something about you have to find a project you are interested in to learn it. That is really true because the only way to learn to program is to have a need to program (either a class or a personal project you are interested). I would suggest learning how to use API's for sites that you use all the time, because you could probably come up with some cool ideas for what to do with those, and you can implement the API using python. Also I highly recommend About - Project Euler. It teaches you programming through teaching your programs how to solve hard problems that would be difficult if not impossible to solve without using a computer.

                          Hope it helps!

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                          • #15
                            Bit late, but hopefully someone else will see this thread and they can get a couple of more resources..

                            An amazing book I have used for learning python is..

                            Automate the Boring Stuff with Python | Practical Programming for Total Beginners

                            It is free to read online, but if you want the ebook version, it costs money... >->

                            Next, if you want to quickly look up how to do a couple of things.. use..

                            http://learnxinyminutes.com/docs/python/
                            http://learnxinyminutes.com/docs/python3/

                            The first link being for python 2, and the latter being for python 3. It will give you a quick overview of some aspects of the language, but it won't help you learn the language persay.

                            Last, here is a resource that has tons of resources for A LOT of languages, but it also has quite a few for python.

                            Become a Programmer, Motherfucker

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