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  • Jutte
    replied
    But one good about unity3d game development and the Unreal Engine is that they are free*. Unity has good tutorials available and an asset store which is, in my opinion, the best I find about unity, and you can almost find most of the things required for making your game for free!

    Leave a comment:


  • 3nk31
    replied
    Originally posted by reinart View Post
    Most of the Lisp hackers I know actually earn way more than their counterparts doing C++, JavaScript, Java, etc. Might be because there are less and therefore the expertise is hard to come by, or maybe because the problems that these hackers solve tend to be more complicated and therefore the recompense is greater, who knows.

    Likely being the keyword:

    http://langpop.com/

    Notice clojure and lisp right below Cobol.

    I wouldn't doubt that the few jobs that *do* exist would pay highly. I got interested in Lisp when I wanted to learn more about artificial intelligence, so I'm sure the jobs that are available require you to be a top notch problem solver on top of knowing the language. But the point still stands that statistically, you're far less likely to find a high paying job with Lisp and Clojure that you actually qualify for. Your time would be better spent learning something more "mainstream" and learning Lisp on the side (if your goal is financial stability.)

    Leave a comment:


  • reinart
    replied
    Actually there are more and more jobs available that have you use Lisp, Clojure especially thanks to the hard work of the guys at Cognitect.

    Some places that can get help you get your foot in the door:

    Functional Jobs
    Hacker News
    Clojure Jobs
    Lisp Jobs

    I'd also recommend meeting people at conventions and events like Strange Loop, Clojure Conj, Lisp Symposium, etc. Aside from hanging out with some incredibly intelligent people, a lof of networking takes place that can really impact one's career.

    I'm a hobbyist myself, though I've done some free-lance work using Common Lisp and Python when I had to make ends meet, and from a consultant/free-lance point of view, the choice of language matters less than if you were employed in a "brick and mortar" shop.

    While I would recommend any software dev learn the mind fuck that is Lisp just to broaden your perspective, I would not consider it a language that is likely to net you a high paying job
    Most of the Lisp hackers I know actually earn way more than their counterparts doing C++, JavaScript, Java, etc. Might be because there are less and therefore the expertise is hard to come by, or maybe because the problems that these hackers solve tend to be more complicated and therefore the recompense is greater, who knows.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3nk31
    replied
    Originally posted by reinart View Post
    *puts on his flame suit and gets ready to be flamed*

    Language to leran: Common Lisp / Clojure / Scheme

    Greatest book on learning to program:

    SICP http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

    Opinionated guides to Lisp: http://www.p-cos.net/lisp/guide.html
    http://www.flyingmachinestudios.com/...hickeys-brain/

    Gentle intro to Lisp:

    Land of Lisp http://landoflisp.com/

    Lisp book shelf http://www.mozartreina.com/lisp-bookshelf.html

    Collection of interviews with Lisp hackers (free) : https://leanpub.com/lisphackers

    A few great Lisp hackers to follow:

    Zach Beane http://xach.com/
    Edi Weitz http://weitz.de/
    Paul Graham http://www.paulgraham.com/
    While I would recommend any software dev learn the mind fuck that is Lisp just to broaden your perspective, I would not consider it a language that is likely to net you a high paying job. The number of Lisp jobs available at any given time could probably be counted with your fingers.

    Leave a comment:


  • reinart
    replied
    *puts on his flame suit and gets ready to be flamed*

    Language to leran: Common Lisp / Clojure / Scheme

    Greatest book on learning to program:

    SICP http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/

    Opinionated guides to Lisp: http://www.p-cos.net/lisp/guide.html
    http://www.flyingmachinestudios.com/...hickeys-brain/

    Gentle intro to Lisp:

    Land of Lisp http://landoflisp.com/

    Lisp book shelf http://www.mozartreina.com/lisp-bookshelf.html

    Collection of interviews with Lisp hackers (free) : https://leanpub.com/lisphackers

    A few great Lisp hackers to follow:

    Zach Beane http://xach.com/
    Edi Weitz http://weitz.de/
    Paul Graham http://www.paulgraham.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • zarshisha
    replied
    Originally posted by ig_88 View Post
    I've never heard anyone use the terms "lightweight" or "portable" in the same sentence as C# or Visual Studio before. I'd say C# and the .NET framework are actually pretty heavyweight. And portability is only among Windows operation systems, although I guess you could kind of include Linux with the advent of Mono. If you want to be forever bound to Microsoft, go with C#. If you want real portability, Java's probably the better alternative. If you want portable and lightweight, you probably want a scripting language (e.g. Python or Ruby).

    And just for the record, I actually do like C#. My previous employer was a mainly Microsoft shop, so I have some experience coding in C#. Syntactically, it's very similar to Java; if you know one you can pretty easily learn the other. What I really like about C# is that Microsoft has been much better at introducing new features into the .NET framework than Sun/Oracle has been with Java. You have things like LINQ and functional programming.
    If you count mono and unity engine you can write software in c# for a hell of a lot of platforms.

    Leave a comment:


  • keweedsmo
    replied
    Java and python are strong leaders right now. Scala is up and coming. C++ will be around for a long time coming for games.

    Ultimately I'd say python or java are the best starting languages. Depending on what you want to program.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3nk31
    replied
    Depends on what you're looking for. If you want a career, I'd highly recommend playing around with different areas of software development as apposed to focusing on languages:
    • Mobile Development (Android or iOS)
    • Web Development (HTML, PHP, CSS, JQuery, Angular JS, SQL, and maybe Ruby/Golang/Node.js to give yourself some server side experience to call yourself a "full stack" programmer
    • Backend Development (PHP, Node.js/Golang/Ruby/Java, Sql, RESTful api design, cronjobs, etc)
    • Embedded Systems (Get a degree, C and various flavors of Assembly)
    • Corporate Financing (Cobol)
    • Etc


    If you are looking for contract work go to craigslist, assuming you live in an area that they support, and check what people need in your area.

    Leave a comment:


  • omnomnomnom
    replied
    Originally posted by ig_88 View Post
    I've never heard anyone use the terms "lightweight" or "portable" in the same sentence as C# or Visual Studio before. I'd say C# and the .NET framework are actually pretty heavyweight. And portability is only among Windows operation systems, although I guess you could kind of include Linux with the advent of Mono. If you want to be forever bound to Microsoft, go with C#. If you want real portability, Java's probably the better alternative. If you want portable and lightweight, you probably want a scripting language (e.g. Python or Ruby).

    And just for the record, I actually do like C#. My previous employer was a mainly Microsoft shop, so I have some experience coding in C#. Syntactically, it's very similar to Java; if you know one you can pretty easily learn the other. What I really like about C# is that Microsoft has been much better at introducing new features into the .NET framework than Sun/Oracle has been with Java. You have things like LINQ and functional programming.
    True I completely forgot about poor linux XD. I like the fact that .net framework is already included in windows, that way I only need to distribute a small exe. I never tried python/ruby I will probably try it once I have mastered c# and java.

    Leave a comment:


  • ig_88
    replied
    I've never heard anyone use the terms "lightweight" or "portable" in the same sentence as C# or Visual Studio before. I'd say C# and the .NET framework are actually pretty heavyweight. And portability is only among Windows operation systems, although I guess you could kind of include Linux with the advent of Mono. If you want to be forever bound to Microsoft, go with C#. If you want real portability, Java's probably the better alternative. If you want portable and lightweight, you probably want a scripting language (e.g. Python or Ruby).

    And just for the record, I actually do like C#. My previous employer was a mainly Microsoft shop, so I have some experience coding in C#. Syntactically, it's very similar to Java; if you know one you can pretty easily learn the other. What I really like about C# is that Microsoft has been much better at introducing new features into the .NET framework than Sun/Oracle has been with Java. You have things like LINQ and functional programming.

    Leave a comment:


  • omnomnomnom
    replied
    I like c# with visual studio. Easy to make lightweight and portable software. Java and c# are quite popular in my area.

    Leave a comment:


  • hornkeen
    replied
    I agree with [MENTION=263310]LaFemmeFatale[/MENTION], Python is easy and interesting to learn :D

    Leave a comment:


  • LaFemmeFatale
    replied
    Java and Python are really good ones to learn, and they're not really that hard once you get used to them. Java is required more commercially, but Python more fun in my opinion. Java and Python are so versatile and work across all platforms so they are very unlikely to become obsolete.

    If you are looking for an easier language, then VB is a good one. I don't really like VB though, as not many computers are able to run VB software without the environment.

    But personally I would definitely recommend Python, I've been learning over the past few months and I love it so much. Something about it that I can't put my finger on.

    Good luck with what ever you choose! But don't learn C++, that is the most boring of all languages.

    :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Numbing1337
    started a topic Making ($$$!!!!)

    Making ($$$!!!!)

    Hi guys, recently i have been working for a company installing voip phones this was my first job

    Being a temp i have been off work for awhile applying for IT jobs etc

    I was wondering while i'm looking for a job is there a language that is worth learning in my free time?

    I know basic html/css and have worked on android roms/played with hello world apps but really find java/python too complicated.

    I have been looking for work for well over a month now and i really start to get nervous when i haven't done anything in awhile, really wish i could find a way to work from home/study from home...

    you guys have any ideas?
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