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Burnt Graphics Card? Here's A Very Unusual Remedy!

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  • Burnt Graphics Card? Here's A Very Unusual Remedy!

    My 8800GTS died on me several months ago and it's been sitting on my shelf ever since. I decided to put it in my toaster oven for around 5 minutes and then let it cool off before re-inserting it in my PC. To my suprise, the video card works flawlessly; I ran it overlocked 35% for 11 consecutive days @ 100 GPU Usage cracking a WPA 2 handshake and I don't have a single complaint. Since it's been revived I now use it to mine LiteCoins and even with a ridiculous overclock it's still as stable as can be.

    Only use this as a last resort!

    Best of Luck!
    Last edited by 0NENIGHTST4N; May 27, 2013, 02:02 AM.

  • #2
    Cool story bro
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    • #3
      it has something to do with broken wires that get connected by "liquid" copper

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      • #4
        I'm almost certain it's the GPU's memory which was at fault due to a massive overclock; from 1584 Mhz to 2014 Mhz.

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        • #5
          Haha nice work, I wonder how much power one would get out of putting a GTX Titan in the microwave

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          • #6
            What the hell, dude? o0

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            • #7
              This is actually a common remedy discovered in IT nearly 30 years ago.

              In the IT business, I have regularly baked Printer Motherboards, Video Cards, PCI Cards, and Memory Sticks to reseat the soldering joints and get another year to two years of life out of the hardware. I get about a 70% success rate out of this, which is better than nothing at all.

              Unfortunately, every piece of hardware needs to be baked at different temperatures for different amounts of time, which can be difficult to ascertain, particularly with rare / older hardware.

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              • #8
                I guess I got lucky, I simply removed the plastic cover which is seated on top of the heatsink so I can lie the card down on it slapped it in there @ 250 for 5 minutes. The PCB was so hot I could almost bend it like a piece of paper.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 0NENIGHTST4N View Post
                  I guess I got lucky, I simply removed the plastic cover which is seated on top of the heatsink so I can lie the card down on it slapped it in there @ 250 for 5 minutes. The PCB was so hot I could almost bend it like a piece of paper.
                  I believe it.

                  But the feeling when you put it back in the computer and it works? You sit there with a dumb smile on your face, thinking "I. Am. GOD"

                  I know baking makes scientific sense, but it makes no common sense. We all know that heat prematurely kills electronics, particularly laptops, its so counter intuitive, that you just feel like a bad-ass when it works.

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                  • #10
                    l0l, the sensation I got was pretty much like winning the lottery; I felt like a million bucks! You'de think thermal stress is what kills hardware but on the same token, much more extreme temperatures can have the opposite effect.

                    I've had a lot of luck with HDs too which I put in the freezer for the sake of data recovery. Absolutely fantastic results; I managed to recuperate approximately 600 GBs of data which was otherwise unrecoverable before on a WD 500GB & WD 250GB.

                    Although I don't believe in luck, I'm very glad to hear we both had this amount of success and I wish the same to anyone heading down this road!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by npc View Post
                      it has something to do with broken wires that get connected by "liquid" copper

                      Well more Copper is always a good thing. :)

                      But that isn't what happened here. Copper doesn't melt until almost 2,000 degrees which is a bit warmer than your average toaster oven. The result would be attributed to reflowing (melting) solder, which is a fusible tin-copper, tin-copper-silver or tin-lead alloy used in electronics manufacturing. Solder melts in the range of 370 - 430 F.

                      Needless to say, putting a faulty card into a toaster over is a last resort, desperatish type of repair. A bad solder joint (connection) is only one fault that a graphics card might have. And the high temperatures could easily damage components. This is not a panacea.. and it has as much potential to further damage a card as it does to remedy a solder fault.

                      Glad that it worked for the OP.





                      Fortune and love favour the brave .-. Ovid ....

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Copper View Post

                        Well more Copper is always a good thing. :)

                        But that isn't what happened here. Copper doesn't melt until almost 2,000 degrees which is a bit warmer than your average toaster oven. The result would be attributed to reflowing (melting) solder, which is a fusible tin-copper, tin-copper-silver or tin-lead alloy used in electronics manufacturing. Solder melts in the range of 370 - 430 F.

                        Needless to say, putting a faulty card into a toaster over is a last resort, desperatish type of repair. A bad solder joint (connection) is only one fault that a graphics card might have. And the high temperatures could easily damage components. This is not a panacea.. and it has as much potential to further damage a card as it does to remedy a solder fault.

                        Glad that it worked for the OP.





                        For sure - I always approach baking as "this will buy me enough time to notify people they need to buy new hardware ASAP." instead of cattling them.

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                        • #13
                          Given that an RMA is out of the question since it was purchased in 2006 and I don't possess the necessary skill or equiment to attempt repairing the card, the toaster oven seemed like a pretty good idea. Luckily, this proved even more true once I booted into Windows.

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                          • #14
                            You can also try reflowing the solder with a heat gun. I saw this trick from some xbox 360 red ring tutorials.

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                            • #15
                              It's called a gpu reflow. I would NOT recommend anyone putting their gpu in the oven to do this, but it does work. The idea is to resolder all of the points on the gpu that may have been fractured over time due to heavy usage. The best way to do it is with a heat gun so you can focus the heat. There are guides on youtube and overclock.net on how to do this. I had a 8800gtx that I absolutely loved and when it died I did a gpu reflow and it worked. I would not recommend paying people money to resolder your gpu since the price for service can probably buy you a newer and better gpu.

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