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  • 3 Windows tricks

    Windows 10 may have all the modern conveniences, like Cortana, multiple desktops, and app notifications. But that doesn't make some of the old-fashioned Windows tricks from previous versions any less useful.
    Here are three Windows golden oldies worth remembering.

    Desktop shake


    Sometimes you have too many windows open and it's difficult to focus on that spreadsheet in front of you, or just to stay organized. That's when it's handy to know about desktop shake, which first appeared in Windows 7. All you have to do is click and hold the top of a program window, and start shaking your mouse (and thus the window) back and forth. After a few shakes, all open windows on your desktop will disappear save the one you're shaking.

    More Send To options


    If you wish there were more Send To options when you right-click a folder, try this trick. First hold down Shift on your keyboard; now right-click the folder in question and selectSend To from the context menu. Next: Stand in awe of the bounty.

    Stupid XP tricks


    This delves into the realm of silly tricks, but it still works in Windows 10 (and earlier) at this writing. You know when you hold down Alt + Tab to cycle through open windows on your desktop? Well, how would you like to go old-school and use the Windows XP version of Alt + Tab even in Windows 10 or 8.1?

    To do this, hold down one of the two Alt keys on your keyboard and don't let go. Now, tap the second Alt key once then tap Tab.
    Besides the novelty factor, some people might actually prefer this version to the more modern approach, which features a thumbnail image for each open window.
    The XP version shows just the icon for each window, as well as a brief text description of the file or open web page.
    There you have it. Three simple tricks that can save you a little time (or provide a bit of novelty) when you need it.

  • #2
    There is always GOD mode:
    Enable 'God Mode'

    Right-click on the desktop > New > Folder. Re-name the new folder with this bit of code:

    GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

    To enter the "God Mode" window, double-click the folder and go nuts.

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    • #3
      Its changed to Just Alt + Tab key right now so no need to press Alt + Alt + Tab at same time

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dimeuleh View Post
        Windows 10 may have all the modern conveniences, like Cortana, multiple desktops, and app notifications. But that doesn't make some of the old-fashioned Windows tricks from previous versions any less useful.
        Here are three Windows golden oldies worth remembering.

        Desktop shake


        Sometimes you have too many windows open and it's difficult to focus on that spreadsheet in front of you, or just to stay organized. That's when it's handy to know about desktop shake, which first appeared in Windows 7. All you have to do is click and hold the top of a program window, and start shaking your mouse (and thus the window) back and forth. After a few shakes, all open windows on your desktop will disappear save the one you're shaking.

        More Send To options


        If you wish there were more Send To options when you right-click a folder, try this trick. First hold down Shift on your keyboard; now right-click the folder in question and selectSend To from the context menu. Next: Stand in awe of the bounty.

        Stupid XP tricks


        This delves into the realm of silly tricks, but it still works in Windows 10 (and earlier) at this writing. You know when you hold down Alt + Tab to cycle through open windows on your desktop? Well, how would you like to go old-school and use the Windows XP version of Alt + Tab even in Windows 10 or 8.1?

        To do this, hold down one of the two Alt keys on your keyboard and don't let go. Now, tap the second Alt key once then tap Tab.
        Besides the novelty factor, some people might actually prefer this version to the more modern approach, which features a thumbnail image for each open window.
        The XP version shows just the icon for each window, as well as a brief text description of the file or open web page.
        There you have it. Three simple tricks that can save you a little time (or provide a bit of novelty) when you need it.
        ah. the problem with Desktop Shake, is that you all too often lose your active screen (say, if you're doing homework with ;lots of web page references open. It is difficult to focus

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        • #5
          thanks

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          • #6
            Thanks!

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