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Learn Linux w/ Arch!

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  • Learn Linux w/ Arch!

    For those of you that want to learn more about Linux, or have yet to indulge yourself in the wonderful OS. Here are my suggestions:

    First of all, Ubuntu is not somewhere you want to start. This is a User Friendly, Polished Distro. It involves no skill or knowledge (other than Basic OS Install) to use.
    Ubuntu Server takes a little bit more skill, but its still pretty easy to work with.

    The places to start, if you truly want to know how to use Linux is Arch Linux

    Arch Linux is your bare-bone Linux Distro; You have no GUI (graphic user interface) so this forces you to learn the in and out of Command Line computing.. Which if any of you remember/used computers in the early 80's then you are familiar with Black Screens and Green Text.

    Arch Linux has a great Wiki for beginners that walks you through how to install and setup a working Linux Distro. Wiki Found Here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide

    With Arch Linux you can create the Distro however you want; If you want a Server, then you must learn and install all the programs needed to run a server. Research Samba, OpenSSH, and LAMP. Or if you want a Seedbox, then research the programs required to run it. Because Arch Linux is just a bare-bone Distro you are free to do with it as you please, there are is no bloatware or forced GUI; If you want KDE install KDE, if you want Gnome, install Gnome.. There are many GUIs and you are free to use the one you want.

    Also, because Arch is the basic setup, there should be no conflicting programs; since you are only installing the ones you want/need.

  • #2
    Arch is really hard for a beginner, i don't think this is a good idea to start by the hard way, it will discouraged some people to learn how to use linux.
    Beginners should start with a GUI, and if they want to learn more, they should try ARCH.

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    • #3
      I agree with Nolotys. I'm not an experienced Linux user (at least not yet) but starting with Arch will discourage almost any "average joe" who already have difficulties with Windows. A distribution like Ubuntu or Linuxmint might be more suited to the Linux newbie. Many people are extremely allergic to the command line :-D
      Last edited by Opt1k4l; July 19, 2012, 02:04 PM.

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      • #4
        I'm going to have to agree that it's probably best to start with baby steps. Ubuntu is very user friendly and won't immediately deter anyone.
        It's better to let people become acquainted with the command line at their own pace.

        Anyways nice guide. Going this route would certainly be a learning experience.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Nolotys View Post
          Arch is really hard for a beginner, i don't think this is a good idea to start by the hard way, it will discouraged some people to learn how to use linux.
          Beginners should start with a GUI, and if they want to learn more, they should try ARCH.
          I most certainly agree with this, Arch is not for a tux noob.
          Ubuntu is probally the best place to start as it has a GUI, to install programes you can use the Terminal or the store
          Your method is like throwing a baby into a pool filled with sharks and telling the child to swim 50m, if the child suceeds they will become a pro but most likely they would give up and never try again and have a fear of water and seafood for the rest of their lives.

          Syntax
          Patience is not a gift given to you.
          It is cultivated by yourself.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by SyntaxERROR View Post
            I most certainly agree with this, Arch is not for a tux noob.
            Ubuntu is probally the best place to start as it has a GUI, to install programes you can use the Terminal or the store
            Syntax
            I like to recommend Xubuntu to newcomers. It runs faster on older clunkers, but still has all the easy things like Synaptic Package Manager.

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            • #7
              I say shoot for the stars. I started with Arch and loved every minute of beating my head against a wall. It's a great way to learn the architecture and command line. It truly forces you to learn linux. People who get discouraged have only themselves to blame; if you want to learn something that not everyone is good at, it will take time, practice, and patience.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RaNCID View Post
                I say shoot for the stars. I started with Arch and loved every minute of beating my head against a wall. It's a great way to learn the architecture and command line. It truly forces you to learn linux. People who get discouraged have only themselves to blame; if you want to learn something that not everyone is good at, it will take time, practice, and patience.
                Say that to the average computer user

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                • #9
                  I will probably research into it as it will be my next distro to which I will switch when I get bored of Mint
                  Definitely poses a great challenge, but the feeling of actually making and customizing your own OS must be epic to say the least - a true accomplishment
                  A great advantage I see in it is that you install only what you really need, so you save HDD space and RAM resources

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nolotys View Post
                    Arch is really hard for a beginner, i don't think this is a good idea to start by the hard way, it will discouraged some people to learn how to use linux.
                    Beginners should start with a GUI, and if they want to learn more, they should try ARCH.
                    Originally posted by Opt1k4l View Post
                    I agree with Nolotys. I'm not an experienced Linux user (at least not yet) but starting with Arch will discourage almost any "average joe" who already have difficulties with Windows. A distribution like Ubuntu or Linuxmint might be more suited to the Linux newbie. Many people are extremely allergic to the command line :-D
                    Originally posted by hsharma View Post
                    I'm going to have to agree that it's probably best to start with baby steps. Ubuntu is very user friendly and won't immediately deter anyone.
                    It's better to let people become acquainted with the command line at their own pace.

                    Anyways nice guide. Going this route would certainly be a learning experience.
                    Originally posted by Aengus View Post
                    I most certainly agree with this, Arch is not for a tux noob.
                    Ubuntu is probally the best place to start as it has a GUI, to install programes you can use the Terminal or the store
                    Your method is like throwing a baby into a pool filled with sharks and telling the child to swim 50m, if the child suceeds they will become a pro but most likely they would give up and never try again and have a fear of water and seafood for the rest of their lives.

                    Syntax
                    IMO if you truly want to learn Linux, from the ground up, then I truly believe ARCH is were to start. You learn everything from installing applications (instead of using Ubuntus Software Manager, which you just click and install) You will learn what files are need to run this and that, you will learn the Command Line quicker because you will be using it much much more than with a Polished/GUI Distro.

                    I started with Arch (well actually I my first distro was Slackware) but when I found out about Arch I quickly switched. It helped my a lot in learning what goes on behind Linux. And because of it, I was able to snag a cake IT job working with Linux based servers; no schooling required. @ interview, mentioned my experience with Arch and bam, the boss said welcome aboard; no lie.

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                    • #11
                      You can do both on ubuntu, you can install programs with terminal or with USM, so you have the choice.

                      I don't think that arch is good for beginners
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        I once tried LinuxFromScratch. That was one hell of an exercise. Although I haven't tried Arch, I did migrate my distro of choice to Gentoo many moons ago. With modern processors, you can leverage Gentoo's source-based packaging system (portage) to quickly build a Linux system from scratch or start with binaries. It's a very academic exercise, but it can turn a newb into a power user at an accelerated pace.

                        Although they have made huge strides with the Arch package manager PACMAN, the main reason I never tried it was the concern regarding repository security. This concern now seems to be mitigated. Gentoo does sign most of portage's "ebuilds" and you can securely sync GPGed repositories with a webrsync option. I wouldn't describe it as high-end security, but it seems reasonably sufficient. Further, there are overlays and options to create your own custom ebuilds within the portage architecture.

                        I agree these types of distros are for the academic at heart, but it will definitely give you complete control over your OS and peripheral applications. Non-academics need not apply!

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