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  • port forwarding issues with two routers

    Hope this is in the right section... we have a cabin and a house on our property i live in the cabin and the house has the modem/router. so to get wifi over here i have a more powerful router connected through Ethernet(not set up as a repeater or an access point) to our crappy century link router. and ive had zero success port forwarding. never done it til about 3 months ago but its never worked an im quite tech savy. ive read that with dmz enabled with multiple routers causes problems so thats disabled and no issues. beyond that idk what to do. my issue is with filezilla. the router/firewall config setup doesnt work (503 error) due to ports not being open. my upload speeds to my server are horrendous at 40Kib/s no matter what i do. both routers plus firewall have specified ports enabled. any suggestions?? thanks!

  • #2
    it depends how your router works and for this explanation i will go out from that fact that it really routes data. i presume the following setup
    internet ->router->router->you
    now lets add some example ip addresses and let's assume your subnetmask is 255.255.255.0 so that the cabinnetwork and the main network don't mix (if you want them to mix you should have your cabin router configured as aswitch not a router)
    INTERNET->someipfromisp ROUTER 192.168.0.1->192.168.0.2 CABINROUTER 192.168.1.1->192.168.1.20YOU
    as you can see i took the one side of the router and the other side to represent the different interfaces.
    Now depending on how smart you routers are the following should work
    (example port 22)
    ROUTER NAT
    192.168.1.20:22
    CABIN ROUTER NAT
    192.168.1.20:22
    However consumer devices are often bad design so the following might also work (if the first router is shit and also modifies Layer 3 and not only Layer 2 i've seen this happen)
    ROUTER NAT
    192.168.0.2:22
    CABIN ROUTER NAT
    192.168.1.20:22
    If this doesn't work you could also opt to have the cabin router in the DMZ since it will enforce it's own firewall rules.Or you could just use the cabin router as a switch this would make it so that the house and cabin network are the same and you'll receive an IP from the DHCP in the main house.In that case you only need to NAT on the main router

    Edit
    I forgot to mention the obvious but that you should modify the routing table of router in the main house so that it knows that network 192.168.1.0/24 can be reached trough 192.168.0.2
    Last edited by duketom; May 13, 2015, 06:29 AM.
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    • #3
      I have the same setup in my house. Set the second router to bridged mode (disable DHCP and NAT) and give it a static IP. Use your first router to configure all your ports, DMZ, QoS, etc.
      Your second router will now function as a simple switch with wifi.

      Setup: Modem -> Router #1 (House) -> Router #2 (Cabin).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by duketom View Post
        it depends how your router works and for this explanation i will go out from that fact that it really routes data. i presume the following setup
        internet ->router->router->you
        now lets add some example ip addresses and let's assume your subnetmask is 255.255.255.0 so that the cabinnetwork and the main network don't mix (if you want them to mix you should have your cabin router configured as aswitch not a router)
        INTERNET->someipfromisp ROUTER 192.168.0.1->192.168.0.2 CABINROUTER 192.168.1.1->192.168.1.20YOU
        as you can see i took the one side of the router and the other side to represent the different interfaces.
        Now depending on how smart you routers are the following should work
        (example port 22)
        ROUTER NAT
        192.168.1.20:22
        CABIN ROUTER NAT
        192.168.1.20:22
        However consumer devices are often bad design so the following might also work (if the first router is shit and also modifies Layer 3 and not only Layer 2 i've seen this happen)
        ROUTER NAT
        192.168.0.2:22
        CABIN ROUTER NAT
        192.168.1.20:22
        If this doesn't work you could also opt to have the cabin router in the DMZ since it will enforce it's own firewall rules.Or you could just use the cabin router as a switch this would make it so that the house and cabin network are the same and you'll receive an IP from the DHCP in the main house.In that case you only need to NAT on the main router

        Edit
        I forgot to mention the obvious but that you should modify the routing table of router in the main house so that it knows that network 192.168.1.0/24 can be reached trough 192.168.0.2
        wonderful! thank you. questions though. making them a switch seems logical in my situation. as the second person who commented pointed out i can disable dhcp and nat easily on my second router its a (asus RT n66u) router but how do i set to a static ip. my isp uses static ip as far as i know but i also use a vpn(not configed in the router just per my command on the comp i choose) so i assume its static not dynamic. curious as to how i set that up on the second router since its more my isp then me?

        Originally posted by Fluttershy View Post
        I have the same setup in my house. Set the second router to bridged mode (disable DHCP and NAT) and give it a static IP. Use your first router to configure all your ports, DMZ, QoS, etc.
        Your second router will now function as a simple switch with wifi.

        Setup: Modem -> Router #1 (House) -> Router #2 (Cabin).
        thank you i will definitely try your suggestions
        Last edited by wayneo99; May 14, 2015, 05:01 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wayneo99 View Post
          wonderful! thank you. questions though. making them a switch seems logical in my situation. as the second person who commented pointed out i can disable dhcp and nat easily on my second router its a (asus RT n66u) router but how do i set to a static ip. my isp uses static ip as far as i know but i also use a vpn(not configured in the router just per my command on the comp i choose) so i assume its static not dynamic. curious as to how i set that up on the second router since its more my isp then me?
          well you only need to enable bridging on the cabin router (i'm not familiar with specifics of consumer hardware but i guess you'll get there with some googling)
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          • #6
            The static IP setting should be on the same page as the DHCP option.
            If you can't find it, set an IP reservation on your first router.

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            • #7
              I probably don't have nearly as much experience as Duketom or Fluttershy, and I'm new here, but I would like to help.
              Not long ago, I ran into a situation where I was wrestling a managed modem+router combo from an ISP that refused to cooperate. I could not access or configure the managed combo, but I knew it had it's own IP segment (dynamic and something other than 192.168.1.1), so I bridged an Asus RT-N66U to the combo (one ethernet in the 1st port the combo's 4-port switch connected to the Internet port of the RT-N66U). All devices on the network were then connected to the RT-N66U via wi-fi and another 8-port switch, and port-forwarding (done through the RT-N66U) works as it should. The RT-N66U is in Wireless Router Mode (default) and it reports it's WAN as the external IP, so it looks and feels like a normal uncomplicated home network.
              That network has been going strong for about two years now with the RT-N66U cascaded. I know they have had power-outtages and I'm sure dynamic IP re-assignments and probably even the modem+router combo upgraded to a new unit. I hope that helps.
              Last edited by Euly; May 14, 2015, 07:16 PM.

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              • #8
                Unless you have a specific requirement to firewall off the cabin you are better off just using the router/AP in the cabin as an AP. I think the easiest way to do this is just plug the Ethernet cable coming from the main house into one of the regular switch ports. You will probably have to disable the DHCP server feature on the cabin router so that you only get IP's from the main router. At this point everything will be layer 1/2 inside the cabin. If you can't disable the DHCP server on the cabin router make sure they are issuing IP's from the same subnet hopefully not within the same range IE main house 192.168.0.2-100 cabin 192.168.0.101-254. If you are lucky the router has the option of being put into an AP only mode at which point you don't have to worry about any of this, you just plug the Ethernet cable in the regular switch port. GL

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