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Vinyl Ripping - Normalizing

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  • Vinyl Ripping - Normalizing

    Hello,

    I was wondering if normalizing is the way to go for upping a vinyl rip. This person thinks no it seems. http://www.hometracked.com/2008/04/2...normalization/

    I currently rip with Reaper which normalizes to 0db. Is that too loud? I know that the what.cd guide recommends normalizing to -0.1db (http://www.torrentech.org/index.php?...CODE=01&HID=23)

    I'm also wondering the difference between Normalizing and Normalizing to Common Gain in Reaper and which one I should do if any. I just plan on normalizing the whole side of the record and then cutting the tracks up. Seems like the common gain function is just for multiple tracks? http://forum.cockos.com/archive/index.php/t-56527.html

    Any help appreciated.

  • #2
    I thought normalizing was an optional part of the vinyl ripping S/W? I got a H/W turntable to do this & these S/W seems to perform the operation well, if the result is a little hissy?
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    • #3
      The audiophiles at W.CD are so obsessive about the quality and settings of their stuff that I'm inclined to take their word for it when they say that a setting is preferred. Do you have a full copy of W.CD's guide to ripping vinyl?

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      • #4
        That torrenttech guide looks out of date. The current guide in WCD actually says normalizing is optional:

        This step is optional. Only proceed, if you know exactly, what you're doing. wrote:
        Once you've got labels created and properly positioned for all the tracks, we will normalize the signal to a normal level. Select the entire waveform (Ctrl-A or Edit->Select->All) and then choose Effect->Normalize. This will automatically set itself for 0dB maximum output, which is close to what we want, and will also remove any DC offset (make sure the option is checked). Type -0.1 into the box and press OK. It may take a moment, and you should see the waveform become larger. If your waveform does not get amplified by any amount, you might have clipped the input during recording and you'll need to re-record with a lower level.

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        • #5
          I think it's pretty clear. If you don't know what you're doing, don't do it. :p

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          • #6
            I think it's pretty clear. If you don't know what you're doing, don't do it.

            It always turns about bad for me when I do.

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