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  • fuck off

    fuck off
    Last edited by zeny; November 16, 2018, 10:50 PM.

  • #2
    How big were those files it was rechecking? If they were all HD movies it's very well possible that it takes 3 hours to do that.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by zeny View Post
      So as the title says it. I have the latest version of utorrent and its crashed last night. When I finally restarted the application, it took 3+ hours to recheck about 30ish torrents. Is the checking based upon cpu, ram, disk is, upload/download?

      Trying to understand so I don't have to wait as long in the future..
      Utorrent don't often recheck data when crashes,Never happend on my pc and i have experience a tone of crashes.
      What changed after crash ?

      The check is influenced mostly by hdd speed and CPU

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      • #4
        Hello,
        i had the same issue a couple months ago, turn out my disk had errors and it slowed down torrents consistency checks so you just have to run a chkdsk and you should be fine or atleast you will know your disk is dieing.

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        • #5
          fuck off
          Last edited by zeny; November 16, 2018, 10:50 PM.

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          • #6
            i find a 10 gig movie will recheck much much faster than a 10 gig season pack..
            but i don't know why it would have made you recheck on just a crash.. thats very strange. i re-add thing's i've moved home from my seedbox and utorrent rechecks before allowing me to seed.. do you cross seed files at different trackers? are you sure you've been doing that right? meaning is there a possibility some of these were cross seeding and utorrent replaced original data for tracker 1's .torrent with data from tracker 2? do you normally force start things? you said it had to recheck ~30 torrents.. is that 100% of what you have seeded or is there a possibility that those 30 torrents had a common denominator between them? i.e. all from a network drive, all cross seeded, all were incomplete when it crashed.. anything like that

            cant find a setting in my uTorrent (3.2.2) that would cause a force recheck when either completed or upon restart, so i have to venture and guess that if they aren't incomplete torrents you're working on (recheck = normal) there's a possibility you're trying to seed bad or the wrong data :o

            to your original question: hash checking is completely CPU but goes through each 'chunk' of the torrent for a checksum.. so networked disks will be much much slower and unless your'e seeding off an ssd, your hd speed will be the limiting factor
            Last edited by Erur; July 7, 2014, 12:45 AM.

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            • #7
              According to me it does not only depend on cpu.It also depends on file size and number of files.
              For example on a same pc,a 20gb file would take less time to recheck than a folder of 20gb containing 20-30 files

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              • #8
                As I understand it, the torrent file contains a hash for each piece of the file you are downloading. It simply checks the hashes for each piece you think you have, against the checklist. Much like when you download a torrent, any piece that does not match is discarded.
                In more detail, based off the bitorrent specifications you have your downloaded file, 'piece length' and 'pieces'. Piece length is the size of each piece, and pieces is simply the sha1 sum of each piece, appended to the previous piece to form a long string.
                To simplify things, lets assume you preallocated the file, and you basically have a large 'padded' file of equal length to your source file. First, based off piece length, the program gets the first n bits of the file, and does a SHA1 sum. It then compares the SHA1 sum of the file to the corresponding part of 'pieces'. If they match, we're good. Else, its marked as no good and discarded.

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                • #9
                  Yes, I had this a couple of times re-checking BDRs at 23GB takes a long time...
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