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  • Speed issues...missing something stupid...

    Ok so speed test are constantly showing an upload of 1 mbps -1.5 mbps and a DL of 13.mbps to 17mbps but I never get over 1.7 DL or 130 kbps UP and that's with dozens of tests with only one torrent ether uploading or downloading... I just don't know what im doing wrong.... can any one help so I can be the best member of the community as I can be? :\

  • #2
    If I read post correctly, problem may be a confusion of units of measurement being used....in a nut shell...

    The speed test is given in units of megabits per second (Mb/s).....on the other hand Torrent apps such as utorrent, rtorrent etc. show speeds in units of megabytes per second (MB/s). 8 bits = 1 byte. Therefore your speedtest DL of 16.14Mb/s is = to 2.02MB/s and when converted, UL of 1.08Mb/s = 252KB/s

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    • #3
      there are a couple of reasons this is happening
      1. your ISP is throttling your p2p traffic
      2. your torrent client's port i not preperly forwarded in your router and you seem non-connectable to the rest of peers

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      • #4
        Thank you so much for clearing this up. I was not aware that Speedtest and Utorrent used different units of measurement.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by t8ster_0 View Post
          If I read post correctly, problem may be a confusion of units of measurement being used....in a nut shell...

          The speed test is given in units of megabits per second (Mb/s).....on the other hand Torrent apps such as utorrent, rtorrent etc. show speeds in units of megabytes per second (MB/s). 8 bits = 1 byte. Therefore your speedtest DL of 16.14Mb/s is = to 2.02MB/s and when converted, UL of 1.08Mb/s = 252KB/s
          This, though t8ster_0 confused himself when calculating 252 upload. 1700KB/s / 130KB/s is all you can expect, would be nice if ISPs made this clear

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          • #6
            This is something that a surprising number of people get mixed up with. If you sign up for an internet connection which promises, say, "20mbps", you think 'Great 20 Mega bytes per second is perfect!". But when you actually start downloading a torrent or a file the max speed only seems to be 2.5 mega bytes per second.

            This is because ISPs are actually quoting MegaBits per second. Bits value are often used in transfer speeds, less so nowadays - But of course ISPs want to hang on to this as it makes them sound so great. It's just like Milimeteres and Centimetres really, they both measure distance. Megabits and megabytes both measure file size.

            One MegaByte = Eight MegaBits

            You can tell the difference between the two when they are written because MegaBytes per second is written as: MBps, and MegaBits is written as: Mbps. (Notice that the capital B refers to Bytes). When you see your download speed on your torrent client, or when downloading from your browser 99% of the time it will be shown as MegaBytes per second, this is why it seems to be a lot slower than what your ISP says. But as soon as you do a speed test, it suddenly shoots up, this is because speed tests use MegaBits per second.

            If you are signing up for a new internet connection, and you want to know what kind of speeds you'll actually be getting in MegaBytes per second, simply divide the quoted speed by 8, and that will give you the speed in MegaBytes. (This is because they are eight bits in a byte).

            I hope this information helps a lot of you (Sorry if you are already an internet pro and know this, but a lot of people don't). And also, hopefully this will help you to hate your ISP less!


            ~Sbies.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nexus123 View Post
              Thank you so much for clearing this up. I was not aware that Speedtest and Utorrent used different units of measurement.
              Filesize is generally measured in Bytes. Like a DVD is 4.7 GB for a standard one.

              Edit: Sbies already pointed this out. But it is pretty standard across the board. ISPs advertise in bits, because their customers don't know the difference, most of the time, and so it sounds faster than talking about KBps.
              Last edited by mtguy8787; February 6, 2014, 03:20 PM.

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