Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anti-Piracy Groups Want Google to Lift DMCA Takedown Cap

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anti-Piracy Groups Want Google to Lift DMCA Takedown Cap

    Source: TorrentFreak - by Ernesto - Click on the link Anti-Piracy Groups Want Google to Lift DMCA Takedown Cap

    Google is being criticized by copyright holders for the limits it puts on the number of “pirate” links that can be removed per day. The Hollywood -funded anti-piracy organization BREIN wants to increase the daily DMCA cap from 10,000 to 40,000 and eventually remove the restrictions altogether. The RIAA further wants the ability to do more queries to find illegal content and previously said that the current limits are “miniscule.”

    There’s an interesting battle going on between copyright holders and search giant Google.
    Over the past months the number of removal requests has increased dramatically, up to a point where Google hinted that the massive number of takedowns could threaten freedom of speech.
    Copyright holders on their turn say that they are simply protecting their business. They are going full steam ahead removing millions of links per week and pushing Google to the limits, quite literally.
    As it turns out, Google is throttling the number of daily takedown requests to 10,000 URLs per copyright holder per day. Since some copyright holders are reaching this limit they want Google to lift the cap.
    Dutch anti-piracy group BREIN, which represent a variety of media companies, says it is optimistic that Google will soon allow more URLs to be reported.
    “We expect to go to a limit of 40,000 URLs per day soon, and eventually we hope to be able to report URLs without any limitations,” BREIN’s director Kim Kuik told Nu.nl.
    However, thus far Google hasn’t changed anything and in a response the company defended its policy. Google says it can’t ‘simply’ increase the limits as this may lead to technical problems.
    The daily limits are put in place “in order to prevent the system from having to deal with unexpected peaks, which can cause technical problems,” Google spokesman Mark Jansen said in a comment.
    BREIN are not alone in their calls for more freedom to censor Google’s index. Their stance is corroborated by other anti-piracy groups including the RIAA.
    The RIAA told TorrentFreak that it wants Google to do more, and pointed to critique the record labels gave previously. The RIAA said that with the present limits it can’t successfully defend its rights.
    “Google has the resources to allow take downs that would more meaningfully address the piracy problem it recognizes, given that it likely indexes hundreds of millions of links per day. Yet this limitation remains despite requests to remove it,” RIAA noted.
    In addition to unthrottling the URL limits, RIAA also says it wants to lift the cap on the number of queries they can execute per day to find infringing content.
    “Google places artificial limits on the number of queries that can be made by a copyright owner to identify infringements.”
    “The number of queries they allow is miniscule, especially when you consider that Google handles more than 3 billion searches per day. Yet Google has denied requests to remove this barrier to finding the infringements,” RIAA said.
    Without these extra powers the copyright holders fear that they are unable to keep up with the hundreds of thousands of infringing links that are added to Google every day.
    That said, it is worth nothing that despite BREIN’s calls to lift the 10,000 URL per day limit, the current submission don’t come close to the cap. The group is currently sending less than 5,000 URLs per day on average according to Google’s Transparency Report.
    One thing’s for sure, this won’t be the last thing we hear about Google’s takedown policy. Aside from exercising their rights, copyright holders have found that it’s a good way to pressure Google to do more about piracy.
    News Picked - Untouched



  • #2
    Google says it can’t ‘simply’ increase the limits as this may lead to technical problems.
    The daily limits are put in place “in order to prevent the system from having to deal with unexpected peaks, which can cause technical problems,” Google spokesman Mark Jansen said in a comment.

    I love how RIAA and their ilk whine about the cost of submitting takedowns, yet they're perfectly happy to pressure Google into picking up the tab to defend their so-called 'rights.' In other words, it's okay if it costs Google money just so long as it' doesn't cost RIAA.

    As stated in a previous thread, hyperlinks are to piracy what sidewalks are to drug dealers. They both facilitate contact but neither actually constitutes a crime. If RIAA wants to censor unlimited links then they should get a life and/or pony up the costs.
    Thanks to the powers that be for VIP

    Comment


    • #3
      Its really simple if I was Google I would drop it down to 50 a day and then I would tell them that each take down would require man hours therefore to offset cost each take down notice would cost $100 each.

      Comment


      • #4
        agreed. they should just be happy that google is helping by taking them down. i feel google should somehow be subsidized for this.

        Comment


        • #5
          Soon Google will just be the indexer for the MAFIAA groups. How long until the MAFIAA uses the automated system to take down bad reviews? The system is broken when you do not have accountability for false accusations. I feel the falsely accused should get compensated from the rights holders issuing the DMCA. Say $4000 per day per page.

          Comment


          • #6
            “Google has the resources to allow take downs that would more meaningfully address the piracy problem it recognizes, given that it likely indexes hundreds of millions of links per day. Yet this limitation remains despite requests to remove it,” RIAA noted.
            Yeah, why don't they pay for that "resources"... Freaking money grabbers

            Comment


            • #7
              I have to say I have great respect for Google and what they've done for internet users over the years. And I have faith they will do what they can for their users.

              Comment


              • #8
                I read in another thread that Google is remarkably highly regarded when it comes to protecting user privacy, even though the data they mine is staggeringly colossal. We'll see how long that holds out, but it speaks to some regard as to the ethics Google has at the moment. All the same, there has to be something that can be done against the RIAA and MPAA, the RIAA especially, only because I know how music gets distributed and what music is placed where in stores in real life and online. It's... just wrong! I don't even have words to describe it within the scope of this thread, but assuming the MPAA is the same, which they likely are, as they generate more money than the RIAA would, I'll say this: Stay the fuck away from the mainstream. Talk to people, listen to things on your own, form your own opinions, THINK FOR YOURSELVES! I know I sound like a freaking hipster, but I'm telling you: One thing that all these big organizations are afraid of is people thinking for themselves.

                I know, it's probably wishful thinking to have everyone think for themselves, but we're part of a community that is full of people thinking for themselves, so what I'll say instead is that we should spread the message: Get people to think for themselves. We already do, so we have the power and responsibility (Thanks, Ben Parker) to encourage others to do the same. One part of thinking for one's self is to examine everything about yourself. What do you like? What do you dislike? How can you change it? Even if we have our own well formed opinions, there's always room to improve. Talk to others who don't share your opinion. Challenge yourself.

                Holy crap this is long. (Okay, It's not that long, but before I start rambling,) I'll tl;dr it: Anti-piracy groups are insidious. If it's popular, it's probably bad. Instead, think for yourself and get others to do the same. Always improve yourself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  More of the same from RIAA, trying to shift the cost of targeting links and individuals by attempting to force google and ISPs to do the work for them.
                  You'd think they'd understand the principle of "what goes around goes around" - people and companies like to avoid paying what they can.
                  That's one principle underlying both sides of this contest...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I fear for the worst...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The common denominator is : THIS DOES NOT LOOK GOOD!!!!

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X