Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WEB-DL is like Remux?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WEB-DL is like Remux?

    Hey,

    So we all know that WEB-DL come from iTunes, I download all my TV shows in WEB-DL, the quality is amazing, and I was wondering, since all the TV shows/movies/documentaries from iTunes are all DRM protected, those WEB-DL .mkv that we all download, are they re-econded (meaning there is a loss of quality from the original file), or the DRM is just stripped-out like a Remux and the actual TV show is 100% untouched?

    In simple words, when I download a WEB-DL .mkv, is it 100% like if I just bought it from iTunes?

    Many thanks

  • #2
    WEB-DL is compressed usually in X264 codec. It's not like a Remux, because a Remux is uncompressed. Remuxes are just Bluray, they just get the tracks and put them in an MKV file. When you download a WEB-DL it's the exact same as the source, which as an example would be iTunes, usually 2-3 GB. WEB-DL is definitely not like a Remux. Most WEB-DL are lower file size and experts usually go for Remuxes when they want quality. WEB-DL does have a loss of quality.





    Comment


    • #3
      Well, yeah, my bad, I didn't explained very well, I know what's a Remux and what's a WEB-DL thanks

      I was talking about the idea of a Remux, a Remux is the main file of a Blu-ray stripped-out into a .mkv and I was wondering if a WEB-DL is stripped-out of the original .m4v into a .mkv the same way a Remux is stripped-out of a Blu-ray (without any quality loss)

      So the WEB-DL are Remuxed right? They keep the contents audio/video intact, guaranteed the exact 1:1 quality as the original?
      Last edited by scump; March 24, 2015, 10:00 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by scump View Post
        Well, yeah, my bad, I didn't explained very well, I know what's a Remux and what's a WEB-DL thanks

        I was talking about the idea of a Remux, a Remux is the main file of a Blu-ray stripped-out into a .mkv and I was wondering if a WEB-DL is stripped-out of the original .m4a into a .mkv the same way a Remux is stripped-out of a Blu-ray.

        I was asking if the WEB-DL are Remuxed right? They keep the contents audio/video intact, guaranteed the exact 1:1 quality as the original right?
        M4A is an audio file.

        WEB-DL is compressed. The people who encode the WEB-DL probably get it from the uncompressed sources. Like a bluray. WEB-DL is not Remuxed, it is encoded usually to X264.





        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HeavensRedeemer View Post
          M4A is an audio file.
          Yep, my bad, I was talking about .m4v

          Originally posted by HeavensRedeemer View Post
          WEB-DL is compressed.
          Well, everything on iTunes is already compressed.

          Originally posted by HeavensRedeemer View Post
          The people who encode the WEB-DL probably get it from the uncompressed sources. Like a bluray.
          Wait, what? WEB-DL are all from iTunes, not from Blu-ray...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by scump View Post

            Wait, what? WEB-DL are all from iTunes, not from Blu-ray...
            The people who upload the files to iTunes have to get their media from somewhere right?





            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by HeavensRedeemer View Post
              The people who upload the files to iTunes have to get their media from somewhere right?
              Yes, but that wasn't my question.

              To summarise:

              1 - Apple receive the TV shows in a lossless format
              2 - They compress them into .m4v and put them on iTunes
              3 - People from the scene download them as .m4v from iTunes and put them into .mkv as WEB-DL

              And my initial question was, those people from the scene, at the 3rd step, do they compress again the files like Apple already did in the 2nd step, or do they Remux them into .mkv?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by scump View Post
                Yes, but that wasn't my question.

                To summarise:

                1 - Apple receive the TV shows in a lossless format
                2 - They compress them into .m4v and put them on iTunes
                3 - People from the scene download them as .m4v from iTunes and put them into .mkv as WEB-DL

                And my initial question was, those people from the scene, at the 3rd step, do they compress again the files like Apple already did in the 2nd step, or do they Remux them into .mkv?
                I don't think there's such a thing as a WEB-DL Remux. You mean the idea of changing the filetype. They change the M4V to MKV, yes. They don't transcode it, yes. It's the exact same as the source (just the video and the compression, not the filetype), which is iTunes.





                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HeavensRedeemer View Post
                  They don't transcode it, yes. It's the exact same as the source, which is iTunes.
                  That's exactly what I was looking for, thanks

                  How do you know all that? Are you one of those uploader?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by scump View Post
                    That's exactly what I was looking for, thanks

                    How do you know all that? Are you one of those uploader?
                    Well, I've downloaded a video from iTunes once. It was about 2-3 GB. When you download a WEB-DL file it's usually that size. It's not that hard to change the container for a file. Meaning that it's not that hard for uploaders to grab a WEB-DL and change the filetype. iTunes usually already has the video encoded so all they have to do is download the M4V, use a program to change the container and upload the file. iTunes encodes in X264 so there's really not much work for them to do. I don't think iTunes has that good of protection on their videos anyway.





                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Since when are all WEB-DLs from iTunes?
                      AFAIK it simply means that it has been downloaded from the web.
                      My Giveaways My Requests
                      None None

                      |
                      |
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
                      |
                      |

                      I bet you're the kind of guy that
                      would fuck a person in the ass
                      and not even have the godda*n
                      common courtesy to give him a
                      reach around. I'll be watching you.


                      'Gunnery Sergeant Hartman
                      '
                      |
                      |
                      |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      |
                      |

                      Thanks, gblaze

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ThaJay View Post
                        Since when are all WEB-DLs from iTunes?
                        AFAIK it simply means that it has been downloaded from the web.
                        I think he's just using it as a codename for it. We all get the idea.





                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HeavensRedeemer View Post

                          WEB-DL is compressed. The people who encode the WEB-DL probably get it from the uncompressed sources. Like a bluray. WEB-DL is not Remuxed, it is encoded usually to X264.

                          ...

                          WEB-DL is compressed usually in X264 codec. It's not like a Remux, because a Remux is uncompressed.
                          Remux is typicaly higher quality than web-dl because it is LESS compressed, however to state that a remux contains uncompressed video is incorrect.

                          The video on a bluray disc is in fact compressed video. As an example, 1920x1080 video at 8 bits of colour at 24 fps is 95mb/s or 334gb/hr. So the average movie would be 700gb (uncompressed), which would not fit on a bluray disc.

                          A bluray remux and web-dl have a lot in common actually, A remux is not re-compressed from the bluray source, and a web-dl is not recompressed from the internet source (as opposed to a BR-Rip or Web-Rip). Both contain lossy compressed video typically using h264 codec. Albeit the bluray remux is typically at a higher bit rate which results in better quality and larger file size.

                          I do agree that remux is the way to go if you don't mind the larger file size, if you want small file size then a web-dl should in theory be better than a bluray rip of the same fize size.
                          Last edited by kiwijunglist; April 23, 2016, 05:44 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re-encodes typically don't involve a remux, and don't cary over any copyright protections; at least not that I've ever heard of.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              After doing a Google search and coming across this thread, I just had to register and post.

                              From the responses that I've read I believe that people got confused due to the term Remux being used and never properly answered the question.

                              What the OP was asking is are Web-DL videos:

                              Remuxed (like what you'd get after running a video through MKVToolnix, YAMB, etc)

                              or

                              Re-encoded (like what you'd get after running a video through Handbrake, etc)

                              from the source material (the source material being the video file downloaded from a Digital Provider such as iTunes or Amazon, not the Blu-ray or other source that said provider used to create the digital file in question.

                              Only reason I brought it up was because I'd also like to know if I should stop wasting my time trying to remux my iTunes videos and re-encode instead.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X